Notes on Contributors

Notes on Contributors

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MICHAEL T. BERNATH is assistant professor of history at the University of Miami. He is the author of Confederate Minds: The Struggle for Intellectual Independence in the Civil War South (University of North Carolina Press, 2010). He is currently completing a book about the experiences, perceptions, and reception of northern men and women who worked as teachers in the South in the years leading to the Civil War.

STEPHEN BERRY is associate professor of history at the University of Georgia. He is the editor of Weirding the War: Stories from the Civil War’s Ragged Edges (University of Georgia Press, 2011) and Jingle Man: The Death and Times of Edgar Allan Poe (Houghton Mifflin, forthcoming).

LISA M. BRADY is associate professor of history at Boise State University. She has published articles in Diplomatic History, Environmental History, and Ohio Valley History. She is the author of War upon the Land: Landscape and Strategy in the American Civil War (University of Georgia Press, 2012).

JIM DOWNS is assistant professor of history at Connecticut College. His research focuses on the history of race and medicine in the nineteenth century, and he is the author of Sick from Freedom: The Deadly Consequences of Emancipation (Oxford University Press, 2012). He has been awarded a fellowship from the Gilder Lehrman Center at Yale University and an Andrew Mellon Fellowship from the Massachusetts Historical Society.

JUDITH GIESBERG is associate professor of history at Villanova University. She is the author of Army at Home: Women and the Civil War on the Northern Home Front (University of North Carolina Press, 2009) and the Civil War Sisterhood: The United States Sanitary Commission and Women’s Politics in Transition (Northeastern University Press, 2000).

ANNE MARSHALL is assistant professor of history at Mississippi State University. She is the author of Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State (University of North Carolina Press, 2010). Her article, “The 1906 Uncle Tom’s Cabin Law and the Politics of Race and Memory in Early-Twentieth-Century Kentucky” won the Richards Prize for the best article in The Journal of the Civil War Era in 2011.

BARTON A. MYERS is assistant professor of history at Texas Tech University. He is the author of Executing Daniel Bright: Race, Loyalty, and Guerrilla Violence in a Coastal Carolina Community, 1861–1865 (Louisiana State University Press, 2009), which received the Jules and Frances Landry Award in southern studies and was recently released in paperback. He is currently completing a book on the experiences of southern unionists during the Civil War era and researching a new work on soldiers and atrocity in Civil War America.

SETH ROCKMAN is associate professor of history at Brown University. His book, Scraping By: Wage Labor, Slavery, and Survival in Early Baltimore (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009) won the Organization of American Historians’ 2010 Merle Curti Award for best book in social history. He and Sven Beckert are coediting Slavery’s Capitalism: A New History of American Economic Development (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016).

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